Egyptian women artists after the revolution of January 25, 2011.

Their work reflects their reaction to the events in Tahrir Square and their disappointment in the lack of recognition of women’s rights by the new order.

Click on a thumbnail below to enlarge the image or to view all images in succession.


NADINE HAMMAN




Nadine Hamman Tank Girl, 2012, Acrylic on canvas and mixed media, 66 x 74 inches, Courtesy of the artist

This piece references the incident during the crackdown in Tahiri Square when the woman in the blue bra was stripped by the military and forced to undergo a test to determine whether she was a virgin. In Hamman’s painting, the woman wears a red bra and rides a tank, the gun of the tank a phallic image spewing sperm/rats





HUDA LUTFI




Huda Lutfi Crossing the Red Line, 2011 Mixed media, photomontage, collage, and acrylic, 33 x 74 inches, Courtesy of the artist

Mubarak’s regime established “red lines” that could not be crossed. Here empowered women cross their own red line. They wear caps with an emblem of a white dove for peace, and the faces include an important Egyptian rock star

Huda Lutfi Housebound, 2008, Mixed media, photo collage, and mannequin legs, 25 x 15 x 6 inches, Courtesy of the artist

The legs of the mannequin are decorated with images of the heads of Egyptian women

Huda Lutfi Lipstick and Moustache, 2010, Mixed media, collage, synthetic resin sculpture, And plastic eyeglasses, Each: 13 x 6 x 5 inches, Courtesy of the artist

The artist is making the point that men and women are basically the same and thus entitled to the same rights. The mannequins are identical except that one has a moustache and the other lipstick





NAZLI MADKOUR




Nazli Madkour, Woman, 2011, Mixed media on canvas, 16 x 17 inches, Courtesy of the artist

This artist’s imagery changed as a result of the revolution from still life compositions to heads of women embodying a more tragic vision. Madkour is one of the older artists in the group





SOUAD ABDEL RASOUL




Souad Abdel Rasoul, Untitled (man with red tears), From the exhibition Maps Miracle, Mashrabia Gallery, Cairo, 2012, Courtesy of the artist

Red tears mark the map-lined face of this man, referring to many aspects of life in Egypt

Souad Abdel Rasoul, Untitled (woman with topknot hair), From the exhibition, Mashrabia Gallery, Cairo, 2012, Courtesy of the artist

Using maps across the images of the faces of men and women, Rasoul emphasizes the relationship between the public and the private aspects of one’s life





GAZBIA SIRRY




Gazbia Sirry About the January 25, 2011 Revolution, Egypt (#1) Oil on canvas, 13 x 16 inches, Courtesy of the Zamalek Art Gallery, Cairo

Gazbia Sirry About the January 25, 2011 Revolution, Egypt (#2) Oil on canvas, 31 x 31 inches, Courtesy of the Zamalek Art Gallery, Cairo Sirry is the oldest of the artists represented. These two pieces show how she was affected by the revolution—jarring colors and shapes